Meet Student Body President Christopher Everett

As student body president, Christopher Everett ’24 says he wants to be a bridge for his peers and to make sure students feel seen and heard on campus.

Everett is a public policy major from Clayton, North Carolina. As a first-year student, he served as executive assistant to former Student Body President Reeves Moseley, when classes were online because of the COVID-19 pandemic. He then served in the Undergraduate Senate but resigned because of mental health struggles.

He joined club gymnastics and said the experience gave him more meaning and a stronger sense of identity. He rejoined student government last year as the deputy chief of staff.

“I think I wanted to bring some of that joy that I felt with gymnastics, that joy I felt when I was really enjoying my time at Carolina, bring that back to student government,” said Everett.

At Carolina, Everett is a recipient of the Harvey Beech Scholarship, named for the first Black student to graduate from the UNC law school. The scholarship is open to Carolina sophomores, juniors and graduate and professional students, and students are selected based on their GPA improvement, contributions to student life and financial need.

“Having a scholarship named after Harvey Beech, one of the first few African American students at UNC Law, means a lot to me to follow in the footsteps,” Everett said. “I think a lot of this role has been me standing on the folks that have come before me.”

As student body president, Everett advocates for students, works with the community, serves on committees and is a member of the UNC Board of Trustees. He wants to make sure students feel like they belong at Carolina and that they know they have different opportunities to get involved on campus.

“If I can leave this role and have folks really feel as though they mean something on campus, that they’re valued, they’re loved, they’re cared about, then I consider myself the most successful president ever,” Everett said.

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